Saturday, August 20, 2016

Other Title Information : Glossary of Library & Information Science

Glossary of Library & Information Science
Glossary of Library & Information Science

Other Title Information is described in this new entry in Glossary of Library & Information Science.

Contents

  • Other Title Information
  • What Other Title Information Includes and what it does not?
  • Does Other Title Information need to be supplied?
  • Is Other Title Information a Core Element in RDA?
  • Where is data recorded for Other Title Information in MARC 21?
  • Where are the rules for recording Other Title Information in RDA?
  • What are the Sources of Information for Other Title Information?
  • How to record Other Title Information if it is in more than one language or script?
  • How to record Other Title Information if it is in more than one?
  • RDA Cataloging Examples of recording Other Title Information in MARC 21
  • References

OTHER TITLE INFORMATION  Other Title Information is information (words or phrases, e.g. a subtitle) that appears in conjunction with, and is subordinate to, the title proper of a resource. Other Title Information is a statement appearing on the item that provides additional information about the nature of the item, its purpose, scope, form (e.g., a biography), genre (e.g., a mystery novel), contents (e.g., conference papers) or subject. It may include any phrase appearing with a title proper that is indicative of the character, contents, etc., of the resource or the motives for, or occasion of, its production, publication, etc. In the bibliographic record, Other Title Information is transcribed following the whole or part of the title proper or parallel title to which it pertains. If the information is lengthy, it may be given in a note or may be abridged.

What Other Title Information Includes and what it does not?

Other title information includes subtitles, variant-titles etc. Other title information does not include title proper, parallel titles, alternative titles, part titles, section titles, cover titles, binder’s titles, running titles, spine titles, sleeve titles, etc.

Does Other Title Information need to be supplied?

For monographs generally do not supply other title information but it may be supplied for cartographic resources and moving image resources. For example, if a cartographic resource lacks an indication of the geographic area or subject matter then addition can be made like [Washington D.C.] when title proper is a generic one, such as Road atlas. In the case of a moving image resource an addition can be made [trailer] in other title information, if only the title of the movie is given on the resource. The cataloger should indicate that these additions were not found on the resource, either through notes or by placing the metadata in square brackets.

Is Other Title Information a Core Element in RDA?

Other Title Information is not RDA Core Element, but it is a Core Element for LC-PCC. According to LC-PCC practice, Other Title Information is a core element for monographs. For serials, transcribe other title information if it provides clarification or support to the title proper that otherwise might appear misleading without the other title information. For rare serials, transcribe other title information according to DCRM(S).

Where is data recorded for Other Title Information in MARC 21?

This data is recorded in MARC field 245 $b

Where are the rules for recording Other Title Information in RDA?

Look at RDA 2.3.4

What are the Sources of Information for Other Title Information?

Record other title information appearing on the same source of information as the title proper applying the basic instructions on recording titles given under 2.3.1. Based on the definition that includes the words “in conjunction with” and “subordinate to”, other title information generally should not be taken from any source other than the place where the title proper is found. Hence if there is a title page that supplies the title proper, other title information should not be taken from the cover or a colophon.

How to record Other Title Information if it is in more than one language or script?

If Other Title Information appears in more than one language or script, record the other title information that is in the language or script of the title proper. If this criterion does not apply, record the other title information that appears first.

How to record Other Title Information if it is in more than one?

There may be more than one instance of other title information, in that case generally they should be recorded in the order in which they appear on the source

RDA Cataloging Examples of recording Other Title Information in MARC 21:

245 10 $a Information access through the subject : $b an annotated bibliography / $c by Salman Haider.

245 10 $a Titanic : $b a novel / $c by Sally Wong.

245 00 $a Cancer research : $b official organ of the American Association for Cancer Research Inc.

245 10 $a War of the worlds : $b a graphic novel adapted from the classic tale of an alien invasion by H.G. Wells / $c written by Stephen Stern ; illustrated by Arne Starr ; lettering and special effects, Dane Cote ; art production, Bill Maus.

245 00 $a Library and information science abstracts : $b LISA.

245 10 $a My experiments with truth : $b the definitive autobiography / $c M.K. Gandhi.

245 13 $a  An A-Z of employment law : $b a complete reference source for managers / $c Peter Chandler.

245 00 $a L.I.S. : $b library and information science.

References:
  1. RDA Toolkit. http://access.rdatoolkit.org/ [subscription required] (accessed August 2016). 
  2. Joudrey, Daniel N.; Taylor, Arlene G.; Miller, David P. RDA basics. In Introduction to Cataloging and Classification, 11th Ed.; Library and Information Science Text Series; Libraries Unlimited: Santa Barbara, California, 2015. 
  3. Chan, Lois Mai; Salaba, Athena. Cataloging and Classification: An Introduction, 4th Ed.; Rowman & Littlefield Publishers, Inc.: Lanham, 2016.
Author: Salman Haider [Revised 2016-08-20 | Written 2016-08-20]

Permalink: https://librarianshipstudies.blogspot.com/2016/08/other-title-information-glossary-library.html

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Title Proper : Glossary of Library & Information Science

Glossary of Library & Information Science

TITLE PROPER  Title proper is the chief name of a resource or a bibliographic item, usually found on the preferred sources of information. It is the title which is normally used when citing the resource. The title proper includes the short title and alternative title, the numerical designation of a part/section and the name of a part/section. The title proper excludes any parallel titles, other title information, and parallel other title information.


See also:

Author: Salman Haider [Revised 2016-08-20 | Written 2016-08-20]

Permalink: https://librarianshipstudies.blogspot.com/2016/08/title-proper-glossary-library.html

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Friday, August 19, 2016

Title : Glossary of Library & Information Science

Glossary of Library & Information Science

TITLE  A title is a word, character, phrase, sentence, or a group of words and/or characters appearing on an information source that names a resource or a work contained in it, for the purposes of identification and reference. Title is the distinguishing name of the resource (or the work contained within) which is usually identified from the preferred sources of information of a resource.


See also:

Author: Salman Haider [Revised 2016-08-19 | Written 2016-08-19]

Permalink: https://librarianshipstudies.blogspot.com/2016/08/title-glossary-of-library-information.html

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Sunday, June 26, 2016

Access Point

Access Point

ACCESS POINT 

A name, term, code, heading, word, phrase etc., a unit of information representing a specific entity that can serve as a search key in information retrieval, under which a library catalog or bibliographic database may be searched and library materials may be identified and retrieved.

Resource Access : Glossary of Library & Information Science

Resource Access
Resource Access
Glossary of Library & Information Science
Glossary of Library & Information Science

RESOURCE ACCESS  That portion of cataloging in which access points are selected and formulated by a cataloger.


USED FOR
  • Access

SEE ALSO

AUTHOR

HISTORY
  • Last Updated: 2017-12-24
  • Written: 2016-05-26

PERMALINK

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Resource Description : Glossary of Library & Information Science

Resource Description
Resource Description
Glossary of Library & Information Science
Glossary of Library & Information Science

RESOURCE DESCRIPTION  Resource Description is a set of data recording and identifying an entity. It is the process or the product of creating a bibliographic or metadata record (a surrogate) or a brief representation containing essential attributes describing an information resource, based on established standards, such as Resource Description and Access (RDA) or Anglo-American Cataloging Rules (AACR2). Resource Description is that portion of the descriptive cataloging process in which elements that identify a resource are transcribed into a bibliographic record; also, the portion of the bibliographic record (i.e. descriptive data) that results from this process.


USED FOR
  • Description

REFERENCES
  1. RDA Toolkit. http://access.rdatoolkit.org/ [subscription required] (accessed June 2016). 
  2. Joudrey, Daniel N.; Taylor, Arlene G.; Miller, David P. RDA basics. In Introduction to Cataloging and Classification, 11th Ed.; Library and Information Science Text Series; Libraries Unlimited: Santa Barbara, California, 2015.
  3. Chan, Lois Mai; Salaba, Athena. Cataloging and Classification: An Introduction, 4th Ed.; Rowman & Littlefield Publishers, Inc.: Lanham, 2016.

SEE ALSO


ARTICLE AUTHOR

ARTICLE HISTORY
  • Last Updated: 2017-12-24
  • Written: 2016-05-26

PERMALINK

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Saturday, June 25, 2016

Resource

Resource

RESOURCE

A work, expression, manifestation or item. The term includes not only an individual entity but also aggregates and components of such entities (e.g., three sheet maps, a single slide issued as part of a set of twenty, an article in an issue of a scholarly journal). It may refer to a tangible entity (e.g., a book, a DVD, an audiocassette, serials, sound recordings, moving images, cartographic materials, pamphlets, reports, newspapers, music scores, microfilm, microfiche etc. that are owned by a library) or an intangible entity (e.g., a website, blog, computer files, e-resources).

Authority Control

Authority Control

AUTHORITY CONTROL 

Authority Control is a process that organizes bibliographic information in library catalogs by using a single, distinct spelling of a name (heading) or a subject for each topic, called as authority record. Authority Record is a record which gives the authoritative form (the form selected for a heading) of a personal name, corporate name, family name, place name, uniform or preferred title, series title, subject, etc. in the library catalog or the file of bibliographic records, and are listed in an authority file containing headings of library items.

Subject Cataloging : Glossary of Library & Information Science

Glossary of Library & Information Science

SUBJECT CATALOGING  Subject Cataloging involves subject analysis of the resource and providing corresponding subject headings from a controlled vocabulary or subject heading list, such as Library of Congress Subject Headings (LCSH), Medical Subject Headings (MESH) and assignment of classification numbers using schemes such as Library of Congress Classification (LCC) or Dewey Decimal Classification (DDC). Subject Heading is defined as the most specific word or group of words that captures the essence of the subject or one of the subjects of a book or other library material which is selected from a subject heading list containing the preferred subject access terms (controlled vocabulary) and assigned as an added entry in the bibliographic record which works as an access point and enables the work to be searched and retrieved by subject from the library catalog database. Classification or Library Classification is the process of arranging, grouping, coding, and organizing books and other library materials on shelves or entries of a catalog, bibliography, and index according to their subject in a systematic, logical, and helpful order by way of assigning them call numbers using a library classification system, so that users can find them as quickly and easily as possible. Use of classification enables library users to browse on shelves to find its materials, determines the place of a book and the shelf, and also collocates additional items on the same or related subjects. Classification also enables the library users to find out what documents the library has on a certain subject. The cataloger assigns a classification, or call number, in correlation with the subject headings.

Used for: Subject Cataloguing


All librarians and information professionals may use information from Glossary of Library & Information Science for their writings and research, with proper attribution and citation. I would appreciate it if you would let me know, too! Please cite as given below:

MLA: Haider, Salman. "Glossary of Library & Information Science." (2016)
Chicago: Haider, Salman. "Glossary of Library & Information Science." (2016)

See also
Author: Salman Haider [Revised 2016-06-25 | Written 2016-05-26]

Permalink: https://librarianshipstudies.blogspot.com/2016/06/subject-cataloging-glossary-of-library.html

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Descriptive Cataloging

Descriptive Cataloging

DESCRIPTIVE CATALOGING 

Descriptive Cataloging includes recording the attributes of a library item, such as the name of author(s), contributor(s), title, edition, publisher, distributor, date, the number of pages, its size, name of series, etc. Descriptive Cataloging enables the user to find and identify a book, by the name of the author, the title, variant titles, etc. Two popular standards for Descriptive Cataloging are Anglo-American Cataloging Rules (AACR) and its successor Resource Description and Access (RDA).


USED FOR
  • Library Descriptive Cataloging 
  • Descriptive Cataloguing

SEE ALSO

ARTICLE AUTHOR 
  • Salman Haider - Librarian Cataloger Blogger

ARTICLE HISTORY
  • Last Updated: 2016-06-25
  • Written: 2016-05-26

FEEDBACK
  • Help us improve this article! Contact us with your feedback. You can use the comments section below, or reach us on social media.

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Saturday, May 21, 2016

Subject Indexing Process

Information Access Through The Subject
Subject Indexing Process
Contents

  • What is an index?
  • What are the most trusted definitions of an index?
  • What is subject indexing?
  • What is the subject indexing process?

Index
          The term ‘index’  has been derived from the Latin word ‘indicare’ which means to indicate or to point out. Here it refers to guide to a particular concept in a document.
          Index is a systematic guide of items contained in a document or concepts derived from it. Items denote the name of the author, title, etc.; concepts may be  like classification, cataloguing, etc. To elaborate a bit more it may be said that an index is a systematic guide to the items of published literature in a collection, or concepts derived from a collection.
          The purpose of index is to locate and retrieve the needed items or concepts in a collection.
          An index is consist of entries. Each entry is a unit of an index. These entries are arranged in a systematic order.
An index consists of two parts:
(i) Descriptive part – It gives items, ideas and concepts
(ii) Location Part – It gives the location where the items or concepts has been discussed or is available.
Definitions
Chakrabortty and Chakrabarti defines an index as:
          “A systematic guide to the items of a collection or the concepts derived from it. It comprises entries arranged in a known or searchable order, with references to show where each item indexed is located.”
The British Standard B.S. 3700:1954 defines an index as:
          “A systematic guide to the location of words, concepts or other items in books, periodicals or other publications. An index  consists of series of entries appearing, not in the order in which they appear in the publication, but in some others (e.g. alphabetic) chosen to enable the users to find them quickly, together with to show where each item is located”.
The Harrod’s Librarians’ Glossary defines an index in the following ways:
1. A systematically arranged list giving enough information for each item to be traced by means of a page number or other symbol indicating its position in a sequence.
2. A systematic guide to the location of the words, concepts or other items in publications, documents and other records. An index consists of a series of entries appearing in some logical order, usually alphabetical, which enables the user to find then easily, together with references to show where each item is located.
3. A systematic guide to items contained in, or concepts derived from a collection. These items, or derived concepts, are represented by entries arranged in a known, or stated, searchable order such as alphabetical, chronological or numerical.
(ANSI  Z39.4-1968)
Subject Indexing Process
          Subject indexing is the process used for describing the subject matter of documents. Subject indexing involves assigning terms to represent what the document is about.
          Subject indexing is a crucial operation in the creation and maintenance of index file, as retrieval of  information depends to a large extent on the quality of indexing. The process of subject indexing involves basically three steps.:
Familiarization => Analysis => Representation
The  first step towards a successful index is familiarization. The indexer must become conversant with the subject content of the document. The most reliable way to determine the subject content is to read or examine the work in detail. It is always wise to look beyond the title for ascertaining the subject content of the document, e.g. table of contents, chapter headings, preface, introduction, opening phases of chapters and paragraphs, book jacket, etc. Reference sources may also be consulted and occasionally, subject specialists may have to be consulted, particularly when the subject matter in unfamiliar to the indexer.
          Subject analysis is a second step prior to the selection of index-terms. After  examining the document, the indexer needs to follow a logical approach in selecting those concepts which best express its content. Sometimes guidelines are provided that may go same way towards instructing indexers in consistent identification of concepts.
          Once the subject analysis of the document is completed, the final step is to represent the selected concepts in the language of indexing system (as index entries). The indexer should be familiar with the indexing tools, and their working rules and procedures  in order to ensure that concepts are organised in a usable and accessible form.

Source: (Chapter 2) Information Access Through The Subject : An Annotated Bibliography / by Salman Haider. - Online : OpenThesis, 2015. (408 pages ; 23 cm.)

Annotated bibliography titled Information Access Through The Subject covering Subject Indexing, Subject Cataloging, Classification, Artificial Intelligence, Expert Systems, and Subject Approaches in Bibliographic and Non Bibliographic Databases etc. 

MLIS Thesis is available and discussed in following places: 
Information Access Through The Subject

The project "annotated bibliography" was worked out as Master of Library & Information Science (MLIS) dissertation in the Department of Library and Information Science, Aligarh Muslim University, IndiaInformation Access Through The Subject is a very much appreciated work (see Testimonials). It earned the author S. Bashiruddin – P. N. Kaula Gold Medal, Post Graduate Merit Scholarship, First Division, and IInd Position in the MLIS program.

This article forms a part of Glossary of Library & Information Science
Glossary of Library & Information Science

AUTHOR

Salman Haider - Librarian, Cataloger, Blogger

HISTORY
  • Revised 2016-05-21 
  • Written 2016-05-21
PERMALINK 
https://librarianshipstudies.blogspot.com/2016/05/subject-indexing-process.html

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Tuesday, May 10, 2016

Extended Date Time Format : Glossary of Library & Information Science

Extended Date Time Format EDTF
Extended Date Time Format (EDTF)
Glossary of Library & Information Science
Glossary of Library & Information Science

EXTENDED DATE TIME FORMAT (EDTF)  The Extended Date/Time Format (EDTF) is a draft date-time standard initiated by the Library of Congress with the intention of creating more explicit date formatting and addressing date types that are not currently regulated by ISO 8601. The date time format ISO 8601 describes a number of date/time features, some of which are redundant and/or not very useful, on the other hand, there are a number of date and time format conventions in common use that are not included in ISO 8601. EDTF responds to a need for a date/time string more expressive than ISO 8601 can support. Current suggestions for additions are being noted and discussed within the EDTF community with the intention of formalizing the EDTF as an ISO 8601 amendment or as an extension to other Web-based date standards. EDTF defines features to be supported in a date/time string, features considered useful for a wide variety of applications.

Contents

  • Extended Date Time Format
  • Availability of EDTF
  • Features and Structure of EDTF
  • Adoption of EDTF
  • Examples of EDTF
  • Tools for EDTF
  • Used for
  • References


Availability of EDTF 

The draft of Extended Date/Time Format (EDTF) specification is available at http://www.loc.gov/standards/datetime/pre-submission.html

Features and Structure of EDTF

There are three levels of support in the EDTF allowing an organization to implement only the most basic level (0), the first two levels (0 and 1), or the full complement of options (levels 0-2). Level 0 is a profile of ISO 8601 and includes features supported by ISO 8601, while levels 1 and 2 include extensions to the features in ISO 8601 to allow for additional date types. Level 1 includes simple extensions and level 2 includes more complex extensions. Each level contains all of the functionality for the previous levels.

Adoption of EDTF 

Although EDTF is still in a draft state, it has been established and formalized for usage. The Library of Congress has integrated the EDTF into other standards managed by the organization, such as the Metadata Authority Description Standard (MADS), Metadata Encoding & Transmission Standard (METS), Preservation Metadata standard (PREMIS), and Metadata Object Description Standard (MODS). In 2012, the University of North Texas (UNT) Libraries implemented the Library of Congress Extended Date/Time Format (EDTF) into the metadata guidelines for their digital holdings which now contain more than 460,000 records. Other institutions are also considering implementing EDTF for different applications. EDTF format is used in the MARC 21 filed 046 in the Name Authority Records in cataloging in Resource Description and Access (RDA). The current LC-PCC best practice suggests, "When supplying dates in field 046, use the Extended Date Time Format (EDTF) schema in all cases except for centuries."

Examples of EDTF
  • year, month, and day (e.g. 2016-05-10)
  • year and month (e.g. 2016-10)
  • year (e.g. 2016)
  • date and time (e.g. 2001-02-03T09:30:01)
  • interval (date range) (e.g. 1906-08/1910-12)
  • For detailed examples of EDTF dates see RDA Blog article: EDTF Date - 046 - RDA Cataloging Examples
Tools for EDTF

USED FOR
  • EDTF

REFERENCES
  1. Extended Date/Time Format (EDTF) 1.0. Library of Congress. http://www.loc.gov/standards/datetime/pre-submission.html (accessed May 2016).
  2. Haider, S. EDTF Date - 046 - RDA Cataloging Examples, posted 9/5/16. http://resourcedescriptionandaccess.blogspot.com/2015/09/edtf-date-046-rda-cataloging-examples.html (accessed May 2016).
  3. Extended Date/Time Format (EDTF), Implementations. Library of Congress. http://www.loc.gov/standards/datetime/implementations.html (accessed May 2016)
  4. Tarver, H.; Phillips, M. In Lessons Learned in Implementing the Extended Date/Time Format in a Large Digital Library, International Conference on Dublin Core and Metadata Applications, Copenhagen, Denmark, Oct 13-16, 2016; Dublin Core Metadata Initiative: United States, 2016. http://dcevents.dublincore.org/IntConf/dc-2013/paper/view/183/78 (accessed May 2016).
  5. Phillips, M. Using the Extended Date Time Format (EDTF). Mark E. Phillips Journal, posted 1/18/15. http://vphill.com/journal/post/4112/ (accessed May 2016).

SEE ALSO

ARTICLE AUTHOR

ARTICLE HISTORY 
  • Last Updated: 2017-12-24 
  • Written: 2016-05-10

FEEDBACK
  • Help us improve this article! Contact us with your feedback.
  • This article is widely discussed, appreciated, cited, referred, and hyperlinked. Some places where it is discussed and referred are given below.
  • GitHub

PERMALINK

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Saturday, May 7, 2016

ISO 8601 : Glossary of Library & Information Science

ISO 8601
ISO 8601
Glossary of Library & Information Science
Glossary of Library & Information Science
ISO 8601  ISO 8601 describes an internationally accepted way to represent dates and times using numbers. It was issued by the International Organization for Standardization (ISO) and was first published in 1988. The purpose of this standard is to provide an unambiguous and well-defined method of representing dates and times, so as to avoid misinterpretation of numeric representations of dates and times, particularly when data are transferred between countries with different conventions for writing numeric dates and times. When dates are represented with numbers they can be interpreted in different ways. For example the date of writing of this glossary entry, 05/07/16 could mean May 7, 2016, or July 5, 2016. On an individual level this uncertainty can be very frustrating, in a business context it can be very expensive. Organizing meetings and deliveries, writing contracts and buying airplane tickets can be very difficult when the date is unclear. ISO 8601 tackles this uncertainty by setting out an internationally agreed way to represent dates: YYYY-MM-DD. For example, May 7, 2016 is represented as 2016-05-07.

The Library of Congress has initiated a draft date-time standard known as Extended Date/Time Format (EDTF) with the intention of creating more explicit date formatting and addressing date types that are not currently regulated by ISO 8601. The EDTF is formalized as an ISO 8601 amendment or as an extension to other Web based date standards. EDTF format is used in the MARC 21 filed 046 in the Name Authority Records in cataloging in Resource Description and Access (RDA). The current LC-PCC best practice suggests, "When supplying dates in field 046, use the Extended Date Time Format (EDTF) schema in all cases except for centuries."


USED FOR

  • Date and Time Format

REFERENCES
  1. Date and time format - ISO 8601
  2. EDTF Date - 046 - RDA Cataloging Examples 

SEE ALSO

ARTICLE AUTHOR

ARTICLE HISTORY
  • Last Updated: 2016-12-24 
  • Written: 2016-05-07

PERMALINK



FEEDBACK
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  • This article ISO 8601 is widely discussed, appreciated, cited, referred, and hyperlinked. Some places where it is discussed and referred are given below.
  • Institut de l'information scientifique et technique (English: Institute of Scientific and Technical Information) [French National Centre for Scientific Research, France] 

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Thursday, April 21, 2016

Professor P. B. Mangla - Famous Librarians and Library Science Teachers Biography Series

Librarianship Studies & Information Technology

Famous Librarians and Library Science Teachers Biography Series of Librarianship Studies & Information Technology blog presents the biography of Professor P. B. Mangla, a living legend in the field of Library and Information Science in India. He served the University of Delhi for about thirty years as an outstanding teacher. He has a distinction of being the first and youngest Professor of LIS in India.

The article is in around 6000 words and can be considered as his authoritative biography The highlight of this article is a one hour interview of Prof. Mangla which is embedded in this article itself. Seeing Prof. Mangla speaking in the interview is like listening to the history of Library and Information Science in India as well as around the world, including his experience with library and information science luminaries such as, Dr. S.R. Ranganation, B.S. Kesavan, Mortimer Taube, and Dr. Carl M. White, and his experiences at the Columbia University, New York, association with IFLA, association with University of Delhi, etc.

Professor P.B. Mangla had his higher education at three prestigious Universities, viz. Panjab University (Chandigarh), University of Delhi and Columbia University, New York (USA). He obtained his Master’s degree in History from Panjab University, and, degrees in Library & Information Science from the University of Delhi and then Columbia University, New York. At the University of Delhi, he was a student of Dr. S.R. Ranganathan, father of library science and library movement in India. While at Columbia University he had the opportunity to study and do research under the guidance of well- known scholars of the world. He was a Rockefeller Foundation Scholar for his studies at Columbia University during the 1960s.

Professor Mangla was a Tagore National Fellow under the Government of India, Ministry of Culture from December 2010 to November 2012. This Fellowship Scheme has been instituted by the Union Government in connection with the 150th Birth Anniversary of the great India luminary Rabinder Nath Tagore. This is a prestigious Fellowship and funded generously to be at par with the basic pay of a Central University Vice-chancellor. Till now he is the only academic who has been honored with this Fellowship in the country in his field of specialization and has been called as a ‘legendary scholar and authority in the field of Library Science’.

Earlier, he served the University of Delhi for almost four decades out of which 29 years as a Professor of Library & Information Science. He had the distinction of being appointed as a full-fledged Professor at the age of 36 years which was a matter of real achievement in his career. During his tenure in the University of Delhi he held several senior and prominent positions such as Head of the Department; Dean, Faculty of Arts; Dean, Post-Graduate (Evening) Studies ( which had an enrolment of about 1500 post- graduate students); and, Chairman, Board of Research Studies (H). He was a Member, Court of the University of Delhi almost for three decades, as also, of its Executive Council (EC), and, Academic Council (AC) which are the highest policy-decision making bodies of the University, for several years. He functioned as Chairman, Governing Body, of two prestigious Colleges of the University of Delhi, namely, Deshbandhu College, and Dyal Singh College, for several years.

He worked in Iran as an Expert and, in Guyana (West Indies) as a Unesco Consultant for several years. He has already visited about 50 countries for professional consultancy or assignments.

In India, he has been closely associated with several Expert Committees/Working Groups, Selection Committees, etc. of the Government of India, State/UT Governments, Planning Commission, UPSC, UGC, CSIR, DST, Universities, and other Public and Private sector organizations. To mention a few, till recently, he was a Member, Research Council, National Institute of Science Communication and Resource Centre (NISCAIR) under CSIR; Working Group on Libraries of the National Knowledge Commission; Board of Management, National Library (Kolkata), Raja Rammohun Roy Library Foundation (RRRLF) (Kolkata), and, presently he is continuing as a Member, Delhi Library Board, and RRRLF. The last three bodies are under the overall charge of the Ministry of Culture, Govt. of India; He was President, Indian Library Association (1981-1983); and Vice- President, IFLA (The Hague) (1985-1991).

He has delivered prestigious Lectures in India and abroad and has been honoured with Awards, Citations etc., nationally and internationally. To give as an example, in 2003 he was invited by the UNO to be one of the 5 Speakers from different parts of the world for a Conference held at the UNO Headquarters, New York. He was honoured with Fellowship by the Indian Library Association (FILA) in 1983 and Membership, the Institute of Information Scientists (M.I. Inf. Sc.) London in 1979.

He has published books, research papers, and edited professional journals, in India and abroad. He has a deep scholarship and indeed vast knowledge of the world of books, book publishing (print and non-print) and related trade of knowledge industry.

Besides his academic and professional scholarship Prof. Mangla indeed has a vast experience of educational administration and policy matters at different levels, both in India and abroad, for which he has a commendable expertise.
"During my long association with Professor Mangla, I have found him a thorough gentleman with a pleasing personality. His professional knowledge, intelligence, and administrative skills is par excellence. Professor Mangla always shows regard and treats with dignity the senior professionals. He is always polite and courteous to his juniors. He has helped many people in life and shaped the careers of a large number of his students."  -- M.K. Jain, Former Chief Librarian, Planning Commission of India.
"I was a student of Prof. Mangla in the University of Delhi. He was a great teacher, a scholar and more of an orator than a lecturer. It was a great privilege for us those days to have been taught by a learned and experienced professor in the field of library science. To me he was knowledgeable, energetic and most respected teacher. He set the benchmark of being Head of the Department of a university. He is one of the top known library scientists in India. I consider him the pride of the profession, someone who inspires others to join the profession and reach the heights, where he could go. I have seen him full of ideas and enthusiasm to guide librarians in national and international conferences. He is known in India and abroad for his professional contributions. I wish him good health and many more years of fruitful professional life." -- Kala Anjan Dutta, Director, American Center Library, New Delhi.
"Prof. Mangla’s and my relationship goes back 39 years. He has been my principal guide and source of inspiration.  He has encouraged me to raise my educational and professional qualification and also my professional work.  His humanism has greatly strengthened my personal conviction and goals.  I can vividly recall remember that day in 1977, when I first met Prof. Mangla in his office in the Dept. of Library & Information Science, University of Delhi for seeking his help and guidance in preparing myself for an interview for a position in the Delhi University Library System.  With his able guidance and blessings, I was selected and joined Ratan Tata Library.  With that small interaction, I was so impressed with Prof. Mangla’s passion for the library profession and his sense of human values that I silently nurtured a secret ambition to work with this great man and to treat him a role model, for the rest of my future career.  Fortunately, Prof. Mangla got me transferred from Ratan Tata Library to the Department’s library and I have had the unique privilege of working under him in the Department’s library when he was Head of the Department.  Prof. P.B. Mangla has established his identity as a teacher par excellence, administrator, and a man of vision & action.  He has been one the chief architects of library science education in our country, since the Delhi University pattern has been replicated in the universities that have been subsequently established. He had already become a leading name not only in India but in the world as elected as Vice-President of IFLA, winning laurels with prestigious national and international awards for his outstanding contributions for the development of library science education. One of his greatest strengths is an articulate speaker known for his clarity of thinking and outstanding expression.  He is often cited as a very difficult and tough interviewer who always maintain quality and standards in professional selections and never compromise with low quality and standards. Prof. Mangla has always believed that if library system of a country goes wrong, nothing else will go right in the knowledge based society and economy. I firmly believe that his life and works has not only been a source of inspiration to me but to a galaxy of library professionals in the country and abroad." -- Dr. R.K. Sharma, Librarian, United Nations Information Centre for India and Bhutan, New Delhi. 

BIOGRAPHY OF FAMOUS LIBRARIANS
P. B. MANGLA
mangla-p-b.jpg
Born: July 05, 1936 Pramod Bhushan Mangla
Nationality: Indian
Occupation: Librarian, academic, historian
Fields: Library science, information science, history
Institutions: University of Delhi
Authority control: WorldCat Identities - VIAF - LC-NAF
Contents of Biography:

  1. Early life and education
  2. Experience with Dr. S. R. Ranganathan
  3. Columbia University, New York Experience
  4. Career
  5. University of Delhi Experience
  6. On Delhi University Bodies
  7. On Academic and Administrative Bodies of Other Universities
  8. On National Committees and Commissions
  9. ILA President
  10. Association with IFLA
  11. Membership of Professional Associations
  12. Lectures and Addresses Delivered
  13. Project Director and Research Supervisor
  14. Research Publications
  15. Editor of Research Journals
  16. Awards and Honours Received
  17. Tagore National Fellowship
  18. Countries Visited
  19. Bio-data Listed in
  20. An Interview of Professor P. B. Mangla by Salman Haider
  21. References


EARLY LIFE AND EDUCATION

Professor P.B. Mangla was born at Chhachhrauli (Haryana) on the 5th July 1936. He comes from a princely state, which was at that time part of Punjab and it was known Kalsia state, and his father was the head of treasury in the state and his grandfather used to be a member of the cabinet of the Maharaja of the state. His early education was in a school in the state itself and after that, the state was merged as one of the states which formed PEPSU in 1948. His father shifted at that time to another princely state which had become part of PEPSU, called Nabha and where he had his further education. He did his graduation and then master’s degree from Punjab University and was a student of master’s degree at Mahindra College, Patiala. He had his higher education at three prestigious Universities, viz. Panjab University (Chandigarh), University of Delhi and Columbia University, New York (USA). He obtained his Master’s degree in History from Panjab University, and, degrees in Library and Information Science (LIS) from the University of Delhi (MLIS) and then Columbia University, New York (MS in Library Science). At the University of Delhi, he was a student of Dr. S.R. Ranganathan, father of library science and library movement in India.

Wikipedia (Kalsia): Kalsia was a princely state in Punjab, British India, one of the former Cis-Sutlej states.
Wikepedia (PEPSU): The Patiala and East Punjab States Union (PEPSU) was a state of India between 1948 and 1956. It was created by combining eight princely states: Patiala, Jind, Nabha, Kapurthala, Faridkot, Kalsia, Malerkotla and Nalagarh.

EXPERIENCE WITH DR. RANGANATHAN

Professor P.B. Mangla: "S. R. Ranganathan was my teacher of library sciences at Delhi University in 1954-55. I consider him my mentor. A great scholar, Ranganathan was considered to be the father of library sciences, not only in India but also across the world. Given his accolades in the field, he was invited to Delhi University, by the then vice-chancellor Sir Maurice Gwyer, to start a postgraduate program in library sciences in the year 1946. He wrote around 60 books and was awarded the Padamshree in 1958. I owe him my successful career in library sciences. Though he is no longer alive, I can vividly recollect the days I spent with him. I still remember how he used to provoke students to talk and also, make students listen to him carefully. As a person, he loved, lived, ate drank, and slept library sciences. He devoted his entire life to the field. He held classes at home, more like the modern system wherein the teacher is available 24x7. Even while taking his regular walk down the road, he was often found discussing the subject with his students. Ranganathan’s basic philosophy as a teacher was based on the Indian system of learning, which involved sharvan – listening and studying, chintan – debating, and mannan – assimilation. I can never forget what he said to me when I was leaving for New York in 1961, to pursue a master in library sciences at the Columbia University. He said: “You will be crossing the Atlantic on the way to New York. Leave whatever you have learned here, in India, in the ocean and go with a clean and fresh mind to America so that you can learn new things with a clear mind. And on your way back, collect your baggage from the Atlantic and assimilate it with your learning in America, so that you can put forward and use your new ideas in the right manner her in India.” The crux of his guidance was – Be open to new ideas and be flexible in your approach, so that the best can be achieved. I think it was a privilege being a student of this great teacher known not only nationally, but internationally as well." 

COLUMBIA UNIVERSITY (NEW YORK) EXPERIENCE

Columbia University
Columbia University's Butler Library
Photo credit: Andrew Chen / Wikimedia Commons
Columbia Library School was established in 1887 by Melvil Dewey himself and was considered to be most prestigious at that time. While at Columbia University (New York) he had the opportunity to study and do research under the guidance of well-known scholars of the world,  such as Moris Tauber, Carl White, Professor Mortimer Taube. He was a Rockefeller Foundation Scholar for his studies at Columbia University during the 1960s where he completed his MS in Library Science. 

CAREER

Prof. Mangla served the University of Delhi for almost four decades out of which 29 years as a Professor of Library & Information Science. He had the distinction of being appointed as a full-fledged Professor at the age of 36 years which was a matter of real achievement in his career. During his tenure in the University of Delhi he held several senior and prominent positions such as Head of the Department; Dean, Faculty of Arts; Dean, Post-Graduate (Evening) Studies ( which had an enrolment of about 1500 post- graduate students); and, Chairman, Board of Research Studies. He was a Member, Court of the University of Delhi almost for three decades, as also, of its Executive Council (EC), and, Academic Council (AC) which are the highest policy-decision making bodies of the University, for several years. He functioned as Chairman, Governing Body, of two prestigious Colleges of the University of Delhi, namely, Deshbandhu College, and Dyal Singh College, for several years.

He worked in Iran as an Expert and, in Guyana (West Indies) as a Unesco Consultant for several years. He has already visited about 50 countries for professional consultancy or assignments.

In India, he has been closely associated with several Expert Committees/Working Groups, Selection Committees, etc. of the Government of India, State/UT Governments, Planning Commission, UPSC, UGC, CSIR, DST, Universities, and other Public and Private sector organizations. To mention a few, till recently, he was a Member, Research Council, National Institute of Science Communication and Resource Centre (NISCAIR) under CSIR; Working Group on Libraries of the National Knowledge Commission; Board of Management, National Library (Kolkata)Raja Rammohun Roy Library Foundation (RRRLF) (Kolkata), and, presently he is continuing as a Member, Delhi Library Board, and RRRLF. The last three bodies are under the overall charge of the Ministry of Culture, Govt. of India; He was President, Indian Library Association (1981-1983); and Vice- President, IFLA (The Hague) (1985-1991).

He has delivered prestigious Lectures in India and abroad and has been honoured with Awards, Citations etc., nationally and internationally. To give as an example, in 2003 he was invited by the UNO to be one of the 5 Speakers from different parts of the world for a Conference held at the UNO Headquarters, New York. He was honoured with Fellowship by the Indian Library Association (FILA) in 1983 and Membership, the Institute of Information Scientists (M.I. Inf. Sc.) London in 1979.

He has published books, research papers, and edited professional journals, in India and abroad. He has a deep scholarship and indeed vast knowledge of the world of books, book publishing (print and non-print) and related trade of knowledge industry.

Besides his academic and professional scholarship Prof. Mangla indeed has a vast experience of educational administration and policy matters at different levels, both in India and abroad, for which he has a commendable expertise.

Presently he is a Tagore National Fellow under the Government of India Ministry of Culture since 2010. This Fellowship Scheme has been instituted by the Union Government in connection with the 150th Birth Anniversary of the great India luminary Rabinder Nath Tagore. This is a prestigious Fellowship and funded generously to be at par with the basic pay of a Central University Vice-chancellor. Till now he is the only academic who has been honored with this Fellowship in the country in his field of specialization and has been called as a ‘legendary scholar and authority in the field of Library Science’.

UNIVERSITY OF DELHI EXPERIENCE

Prof. Mangla did his Master of Library and Information Science from the University of Delhi. At the University of Delhi, he was a student of Dr. S.R. Ranganathan, father of library science and library movement in India. He served the University of Delhi for almost four decades out of which 29 years as a Professor of Library & Information Science. He had the distinction of being appointed as a full-fledged Professor at the age of 36 years which was a matter of real achievement in his career. During his tenure at the University of Delhi he held several senior and prominent positions such as Head of the Department; Dean, Faculty of Arts; Dean, Post-Graduate (Evening) Studies (which had an enrolment of about 1500 post- graduate students); and, Chairman, Board of Research Studies. He was a Member, Court of the University of Delhi almost for three decades, as also, of its Executive Council (EC), and, Academic Council (AC) which are the highest policy-decision making bodies of the University, for several years. He functioned as Chairman, Governing Body, of two prestigious Colleges of the University of Delhi, namely, Deshbandhu College, and Dyal Singh College, for several years. He retired in 2001 after a 29 year-professorship at DU.

ON DELHI UNIVERSITY BODIES

At the University of Delhi, Professor Mangla has held with credit the Membership or Chairmanship of several University Bodies. Important among these were:
  1. Member, Court, 1967-68 and 1972 onwards.
  2. Member, Executive Council, 1976; 1986-88.
  3. Member, Academic Council, 1967-68; 1972-82; 1985-88 and 1994 onwards.
  4. Chairman, Standing Committee (Students) of the Academic Council, 1987-88; 1994 onwards.
  5. Chairman/Member, U.G.C. Fellowships Awards Committee, 1976-86.
  6. Chairman, Governing Body, Deshbandhu College, New Delhi, 1990-94.
  7. Chairman, Editorial Board, University of Delhi Annual Report, 1989 onwards
  8. Chairman, Programme Implementation Committee, NSS since 1989.
  9. Chairman, WUS Women's Hostel, 1990-92.
  10. Chairman/Member, P.G. Men's Hostel, 1978-84.
  11. Member, Governing Bodies of Daulat Ram College, Ramjas College, Sri Venkateswara College, Ram Dayal Anand College, Deshbandhu College, Rajdhani College for varying durations since1976.
  12. Chief Election Officer, DUSU Elections, 1992-94.
ON ACADEMIC AND ADMINISTRATIVE BODIES OF OTHER UNIVERSITIES

Outside Delhi, many Indian Universities had sought the benefit of Professor Mangla's advice on professional matters by associating him on their Boards of Studies, Boards of Examiners and also with their Selection Committees. To mention a few of them, he was:
  1. Member, Faculty of Arts of several Universities of India, such as BHU, Kurukshetra University and Panjabi University (Patiala), Dr. Harisingh Gaur University (Sagar), etc.
  2. Member, Board of Studies, Board of Examiners, etc. in about 35 Universities such as Madras University, S.V. University, Tirupati University, Kerala University, Andhra University, Mysore University, Aligarh Muslim University, Kashmir University, Panjab University, Panjabi University, Rajasthan University, etc. for different durations since 1972.
  3. Member, Selection Committees for Senior Posts including those of Professors, Principles of Colleges, Readers, Librarians, Deputy Librarians, etc. in more than 50 Universities in India.
ON NATIONAL COMMITTEES AND COMMISSIONS

At the national level, during the last about 40 years, there has been hardly any committee, commission, working group, visiting team, panel, etc., which Professor Mangla has not been associated either as a member or chairman. It will not be out of place to mention a few of these which have been benefited by his active participation and professional advice.
  1. Member, UGC Visiting Team for the VII Five-Year Plan, 1983-84.
  2. Member, UGC Working Group for Improving Library Services in University System, 1982-84.
  3. Member, UGC Panel of Library and Information Science, 1977-82, and Convenor since 1991.
  4. Member, UGC Review Committee for Kashmir University, 1977.
  5. Member, Steering Committee, UGC Information and Library Network Programme (INFLIBNET),1990-94.
  6. Member, NIEPA Project Advisory Committee for Developing a Financial Code for University System, 1983-84.
  7. Member, Indian National Commission for Co-operation with UNESCO (Government of India), 1981-84.
  8. Member, ICSSR Documentation Committee, 1978-93; and 1994 onwards.
  9. Member, ICSSR Committee for Development of Information Systems in Social Sciences, 1978-79.
  10. Member, Asia-Pacific Network in Social Sciences (APINESS), ICSSR since 1989.
  11. Member, Committee for Modernisation of NASSDOC since 1995.
  12. Member Secretary, Planning Commission Working Group on the Modernisation of Library Services and Informatics for the VII Plan 1985-90.
  13. Member, Planning Commission Working Group on the Modernisation of Library Services and Informatics for the VIII Plan 1988-89 - 1990-95.
  14. Chairman, Manpower Development Committee of the National Information Systems in Science and Technology (NISSAT) (Government of India, Department of Science and Technology), 1977-85.
  15. Member, Raja Rammohun Roy Library Foundation, Kolkata (Government of India), 1981-83.
  16. Member, Committee for National Policy on Library and Information systems and Services of the Raja Rammohun Roy Library Foundation, Kolkata (Government of India), 1982-83.
  17. Member, Committee on National Policy on Library and Information System (Government of India, Ministry of Human Resource Development, Department of Culture), 1984-86.
  18. Member/Convenor of various Committees, Panels, etc., of the Indian Standards Institution with regard to Library and Information Science, 1977-88.
  19. Member, Executive Committee, INSDOC, (CSIR), 1977-79.
  20. Senior Vice-President and Founder Member, Indian Association of Academic Librarians, 1978-82.
  21. Member, Council, IASLIC, 1982-90.
  22. Expert Member for Selection Committees in UPSC, State Service Commissions, Private and Public Sector Organizations, Commonwealth Scholarships, etc. since 1972.
  23. Member, Governing Body, Centre for Development of Information Technology (CENDIT), New Delhi, 1984-88.
ILA PRESIDENT

Professor Mangla has been the President of Indian Library Association (ILA) during 1981-83. This period shall be long remembered in the history of ILA because of the spectacular achievements made and innovations which the ILA Executive brought about under the dynamic leadership of its then President. In 1983 he was honored with a fellowship by Indian Libary Association in its golden jubilee celebration.

ASSOCIATION WITH IFLA

Not only at home but at the international level too, Professor Mangla has been the Member of the Executive Board of the International Federation of Library Associations and Institutions (IFLA) during the period from 1985 to 1991. He was the first Asian to become vice-president of IFLA. From 1987 till 1991, he was the Vice-President of IFLA. In addition, he has been the Special Advisor of the Regional Standing Committee for Asia and Oceania (1986-90) as also a member of the Standing Committee on Theory and Research of IFLA (1983-91). Becoming the Vice-President of IFLA was not only an honor to Prof. Mangla but an honor to the second generation of Indian library professionals as well. As a matter of fact, this was a recognition by the world body about the importance of Indian librarianship which has attained maturity. 

MEMBERSHIP OF PROFESSIONAL ASSOCIATIONS

Professor Mangla is a life member of the ILA, IASLIC, DLA, and IATLIS. He has participated in the working of these national associations actively. Professor Mangal has also participated, presided over, or acted as director of a large number of seminars, conferences, and workshops in India and abroad during the last 40 years.

LECTURES AND ADDRESSES DELIVERED

Professor Mangla has delivered numerous lectures and addresses--Key-Note and others--at various Universities, Institutions, Seminars, Conferences in India and abroad. A sample is as follows:
  1. Alice G. Smith Lecture, University of South Florida (USA), April 1992.
  2. Ranganathan Memorial Lectures at Vikram University, Ujjain in 1982.
  3. Raja Rammohan Roy Library Foundation Lecture in Calcutta in 1985.
  4. Guest Speaker, IFLA General Conference held in Chicago, 1985.
  5. Presidential Addresses to the All-India Library Conference held at Lucknow (1982) and Mysore (1983), respectively.
  6. Invited to deliver Keynote address for Sri Lanka National Library Services Board Silver Jubilee Celebrations, March-April, 1996.
PROJECT DIRECTOR AND RESEARCH SUPERVISOR

Professor Mangla has directed the following prestigious Projects of ICSSR and IFLA.
  1. ICSSR Project on Bibliography of Materials on Delhi, 1978-90.
  2. IFLA Compendium of Courses in Library and Information Science: Asian Region, 1979-81.
As many as five research scholars have already completed their Ph. D. work under his supervision. He is research supervisor and examiner of Ph. D. theses for many universities in India and abroad.

RESEARCH PUBLICATIONS

A regular contributor of quality research papers in LIS journals of high repute in India and abroad, Professor Mangla has a large number of research publications to his credit. A few of them are worth mentioning.
  1. India (in ALA World Encyclopedia of Library and Information Services), Chicago, ALA, 1993.
  2. Library and Information Science Education in India, Delhi, Macmillan, 1981 (Editor)
  3. Library Education in India, Pakistan, and Bangladesh, Advances in Librarianship. 10. Chap. VI. pp. 191-238, 1980.
  4. Training for Library Assistants, Guyana, UNESCO, 1979.
  5. Fifty Years of Librarianship in India: Seminar Papers, Delhi, ILA, 1983.
  6. Building Library Collections and National Policy for Library and Information Services: Seminar Papers, Delhi ILA, 1985 (Editor).
  7. Ranganation Memorial Lectures, 1982, Ujjain, Vikram University, 1982.
EDITOR OF RESEARCH JOURNALS

Professor Mangla is on the editorial boards of a number of LIS journals. For instance, he is associated with the following journals of repute as:
  1. Chairman, Board of Editors, Journal of Library and Information Science, Delhi University, Department of Library and Information Science, 1976-92.
  2. Member, Editorial Board, Annals of Library Science and Documentation (INSDOC), 1981-83.
  3. Member, Editorial Committee, Education for Information (North-Holland, Amsterdam), since 1983.
  4. Member, Editorial Committee, International Journal of Reviews in Library and Information Science, River Forest, Ill. (USA), 1983-90.
  5. Member, Editorial Board, Third World Libraries, River Forest, Ill. (USA), since 1990.
  6. Associate Editor, Libri (Muksgaard, Copenhagen), since 1987.
  7. Contributing Editor, Asian Libraries (Bangkok), since 1992.
AWARDS AND HONOURS

During 1961-92, Professor Mangla was awarded Rockefeller Foundation Scholarship for higher education and educational travel in the United States. Some of the honors bestowed on him in the years following are:
  1. Elected as Member of the Institute of Information Scientists (London) in 1978 (M.I Inf. Sc.)
  2. Awarded Fellowship (Honorary) by the Indian Library Association in 1983, as part of Golden Jubilee Celebrations.
  3. Appointed as UGC National Lecturer, 1984-86.
  4. Shiromani Award for Human Excellence for 1990.
  5. IFLA Gold Medal and Citation, 1991.
  6. Felicitated by Indian Library Association for contributions to the profession in 1994, as part of Diamond Jubilee Celebrations.
TAGORE NATIONAL FELLOWSHIP

Professor. P. B. Mangla served as Tagore National Fellow under the Government of India, Ministry of Culture, from December 2010 to November 2012. This Fellowship Scheme has been instituted by the Union Government in connection with the 150th Birth Anniversary of the great India luminary Rabinder Nath Tagore. This is a prestigious Fellowship and funded generously to be at par with the basic pay of a Central University Vice-chancellor. Till now he is the only academic who has been honored with this Fellowship in the country in his field of specialization and has been called as a ‘legendary scholar and authority in the field of Library Science’.

COUNTRIES VISITED

Professor Mangla is a widely traveled person. He has visited as many as 50 countries, such as United States, England, USSR, Afghanistan, China, Denmark, France, Germany, Guyana, Hong Kong, Hungary, Iran, Italy, Kuwait, Malaysia, the Netherlands, Philippines, Singapore, Trinidad, etc. in connection with his professional assignments. While serving the University of Delhi, Professor Mangla went to Iran twice, first as Professor and Head, Department of Library Science of Tabriz University, from 1970-72, and then Visiting Professor at the same Department during 1974-75. And during 1978-79, he served as the UNESCO Consultant in Guyana (West Indies).

BIO-DATA LISTED IN

Professor Mangla is a very well-known person in India and abroad. His bio-data is listed in various sources, such as:
  1. International Who's Who (Europa Publications Ltd., London), since 1985.
  2. Who's Who in the World (Marquis, Chicago), since 1984.
  3. Biographical Directory of On-Line Professionals (Marquis, Chicago), since 1984.
  4. India's Who's Who (INFA), since 1980.
  5. Who's Who in India (Bombay), since 1984.
  6. Reference Asia (Delhi), since 1989.
  7. Biographical Dictionaries of International Biographical Centre, Cambridge (UK), since 1996.
AN INTERVIEW OF PROFESSOR P. B. MANGLA BY SALMAN HAIDER (2016-07-13)

Question 1. Sir, please tell us about your early life and education. Was it smooth or did you faced some challenges in your early life and education? How and when you decided to go into the Library and Information Science profession?

Question 2. Mangla Sir, How and when you decided to go in the library and information science profession.

Question 3. Mangla Sir, can you please tell us a little about your experiences in the University of Delhi. We know that the Department of Library and Information Science at present is considered to be among the finest imparting LIS education in India.

Question 4. Sir, Kindly tell us How was the Department of Library and Information Science before you joined and what steps you had taken to improve the quality of education and bring it at par with the international standards.

Question 5. Mangla Sir, we are extremely interested in knowing your experiences at the University of Columbia, the Rockefeller Foundation Scholarship and your works there. You had the rare honour of the vice-president of International Federation of Library Associations and Institutions (IFLA) during 1985 to 1991. Please tell us something about your association with IFLA also.

Question 6. Mangla Sir, please tell us you experience with library and information science luminaries such as Dr. S.R. Ranganathan, B.S. Kesavan, Mortimer Taube, and Dr. Carl M. White.

Question 7. Mangla Sir, your life and contributions to librarianship in India is considered as exceptional and as a role model for library professionals in the country. Please provide us some tips to become a better library professional library professional.

Question 8. Sir how do you see the future of libraries and librarianship in our country. What are your opinions about the present status of library and information science education and practice of librarianship in India? 




REFERENCES

1. Mangla, P. B. Public Library Services in Delhi: Present Status and Development Plan 2010-2020; Raja Rammohun Roy Library Foundation: Kolkata, 2016.

2. Library and Information Science: Parameters and Perspectives: Essays in Honour of Prof. P.B. Mangla; editor, R.G. Prasher; Concept Publishing Company: New Delhi, 1997.

3. YouTube. Librarianship Studies & Information Technology. (accessed July 2016). 

4. Mangla, P. B. The Times of India, Monday, April 30, 2007.

SEE ALSO
ARTICLE AUTHOR

Salman Haider - Librarian, Cataloger, Blogger

ARTICLE HISTORY
  • Last Updated 2016-07-25 
  • Written  2016-04-21
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ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS

Librarianship Studies & Information Technology blog thanks, Dr. R.K. Sharma, Librarian, United Nations Information Centre for India and Bhutan, New Delhi for providing support for the interview of Professor P. B. Mangla.

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